Can you tell me about Coke Zero Sugar?

COCA-COLA ZERO SUGAR LAUNCHED IN THE U.S. WITH A NEW AND IMPROVED REAL COCA-COLA TASTE

NEW RECIPE TASTES LIKE A COKE WITH ZERO SUGAR AND ZERO CALORIES

Since it debuted in the U.S. 12 years ago, Coca-Cola Zero has refreshed hundreds of millions of Americans with its real Coca-Cola taste and zero calories. Now, the brand has a new name, new look, and even more delicious taste.

Through in-house-innovation and extensive market testing, the no-calorie fan favorite delivers an even better-tasting recipe and goes by the name Coca-Cola Zero Sugar. The new and improved recipe tastes like a Coke, but with zero sugar and zero calories. Product hit store shelves nationwide in August 2017.

The company continues to create new beverages and evolve its recipes, Coca-Cola Zero Sugar represents our product innovation. It joins a roster of nearly 250 other delicious reduced- and no-sugar beverages offered in the U.S.

View Coca-Cola Zero Sugar Product Facts.

 

What gives Coke Zero Sugar its sweet taste?

Coca-Cola Zero Sugar: aspartame and acesulfame potassium.

  • Aspartame is a low-calorie sugar substitute. It can be used in place of sugar to give you a reduced- or no-sugar alternative. It is 200 times sweeter than sugar, so only a little is needed for the same sweet taste.
  • Acesulfame potassium is a zero-calorie sugar substitute. It can be used in place of sugar to give you reduced- or no-sugar alternatives. It is often combined with other sugar substitutes, like aspartame. You might see acesulfame potassium listed as Ace-K or acesulfame K.

Learn more about these and other sugar substitutes here.

 

Why do you use sugar substitutes?

While sugar in moderation is fine, too much sugar isn’t good for anyone.

That’s why we offer reduced- or no-sugar versions of many of the drinks you love. We want to give you great-tasting choices with fewer or no calories. Both aspartame and Ace-K help us do that.

See how we’re reducing sugar in our products.

Did you know? 19 of our 21 top global brands have a reduced- or no-sugar option.

Are sugar substitutes safe?

Yes. The sugar substitutes we use in the U.S. are thoroughly tested and confirmed as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has also set an acceptable daily intake (ADI) level for each of these. This is how much you can safely have each day. Read more here about ADI for aspartame and Ace-K.

However, if you have the rare hereditary disorder phenylketonuria (PKU), you should strictly limit your intake of phenylalanine. This is a common amino acid found in aspartame. If we use aspartame, we say on our bottles and cans that there is phenylalanine so please check closely.

Have questions about PKU or your diet? Please talk to your doctor.

 

Learn more